Banner: Knocknarea at Sunset.
Sites 54 and 52 at Carrowmore, both missing their stone circles.
Sites 54 and 52 at Carrowmore, both missing their stone circles.

Site 54

Dolmen 54 is a small unipmosing megalith with a strangely shaped capstone, not unlike the prow of a small ship. The circle was dismantled around 1837 and used to build fieldwalls, and the mound or tertre was ploughed away by improving tenants. The capstone of the dolmen is somewhat de-stabilized and is partly off its supporting orthostats.

Site 54 around 1910 from the Welsh collection.
Dolmen 54 photographed around 1910 by William Alfred Green.

The circle, a physical and symbolic boundary between the world of the living and the lands of the dead, was broken up shortly before Petrie's visit in 1837.

Site 36 at Carrowmore.
Site 36 at Carrowmore.

A fragment of Carrowkeel ware pottery, discovered in this monument by Walker, was confused with a pottery sample from Moytura at Lough Arrow by Wood-Martin. The confusion was sorted out bt Michael Herity in an article published in 1970.

Site 54: - Borlase

Situated at the angle of the field, northeast of the cairn called Listoghil, and to the east of LXV (dolmen-circle). "Of this circle, also, only a few stones are left, the rest having been carried away to clear the ground; but the cromleac is untouched, though covered with stones collected off the land." - Petrie, 1837.

The 
    small dolmen at Site 54 looking to the recently discovered Site 55.
The small dolmen at Site 54 looking to the recently discovered Site 52a.

"Three small fragments of uncalcined bones, pieces of oyster-shell, and a flint flake, represented all that was discovered here." - Wood-Martin. ''The few stones yet remaining of those which formed this monument may now be seen in the fences around a neighbouring cottage." - Wood Martin.

Circle 
        54 from Rude Stone Monuments.
Circle 54 from Rude Stone Monuments, illustrated by Charles Elcock.